Issue 2: “Leadership” has Arrived!

It’s official, announcing the arrival of Issue Two.

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The Almagre Review/La Revista Almagre is excited to share the publication of our second issue. We have wonderful local contributors, writers from up and down the front range, from the prairie, all the way to Wisconsin. To purchase a copy online, click HERE ($12 plus shipping). Copies are also available at the downtown locations of Hooked On Books and Poor Richards.

The Almagre Review will be at the Manitou Art Center on December 16th for their art opening. Copies of issues one and two will be available for purchase. Stay tuned for additional dates and events.

Warm Regards,

The Almagre Staff

Issue 2, December, Promises Special Contributors

When Joe and I started The Almagre Review/La Revista Almagre, we wanted to build a journal that promotes local and regional talent. Often, the most important voices are the ones yet to be discovered. Our goal is to be a stepping stone in helping these authors along their journey toward literary success.

It’s with pleasure we share that two very special contributors will appear in our next issue; Clay Jenkinson and Mike Callicrate. Mr. Jenkinson is the creator of The Thomas Jefferson Hour heard every week on NPR, and Mike Callicrate is the owner of Ranch Foods Direct. As pleased as we are that both of them join us in conversation, it’s the up-and-coming authors that form the spirit of our publication.

The Staff at The Almagre are dedicated to building issues where new talent can appear beside established voices. We do this as a way of saying, no matter where you are in your literary trajectory, our pages welcome people of all backgrounds. We might buy an issue because someone we love to read is in there, but one of the chief delights is discovering a new favorite author who enriches our future reading experience.

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Reflecting on Leadership through the book, “The Character of Meriwether Lewis”

Clay Jenkinson Book

A wonderful book! Clay Jenkinson explores Meriwether’s character and leadership like a geologist in the field, not a benchtop analyst in the lab. This is an intimate journey; he does not simply put the specimen under a magnifying glass and jot down a detailed list. He picks the matter up, rotates it, puts it under various lights, illuminates the textures, and manages to pluck a real person out of the shady bin of historical mythology. Lewis becomes someone we start to know.

What works well in this narrative is the use of various angles to explain the subject. One encounters John Donne, Dickens, L. Ron Hubbard, Eric Sevareid, etc., as vehicles to clarify the complexities of Meriwether’s difficult, sometimes overwrought nature. Clay’s application of Donne’s poetic conceit, likening Lewis and Clark to a fusion core, is an example of successfully using this approach. The polarity of prose is also effective. One goes from literary metaphors, Jefferson’s “theater” of grief in Virginia after his wife dies, Lewis’s “attic” of isolation and anxiety as governor, to the vernacular of being, “shot in the ass.” Whether this works for all is difficult to say, but it contributed to the book’s wonderful readability. In a page, one might laugh out loud, then delight in the discovery of a new word (“hendiadys”), next to feeling sadness over the tragic and rapid decline of Lewis.

One also appreciates Clay’s integrity to truth. It’s quite a feat, to bring to life and humanize someone as mythologized as his subject, yet maintain a constant fidelity to fact. The narrative never veers off into wild speculation, nor does it favor sensationalist assertions over strongly argued conclusions. The reader is led down a rational, sober, extremely interesting path, and Clay offers compelling insight as to how events affected Lewis and helped to lead him to his end.

A supremely interesting narrative about the complex character of one of America’s greatest leaders.